1st T20I | Highlights | Australia Tour Of Sri Lanka | 7th June 2022
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1st T20I | Highlights | Australia Tour Of Sri Lanka | 7th June 2022
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1st T20I | Highlights | Australia Tour Of Sri Lanka | 7th June 2022
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Australia won the toss and decided to bowl first. A top bowling performance from the Aussies ended Sri Lanka with a total of just 128 runs. Australia then went on to win by ten wickets thanks to an amazing partnership from Aaron Finch and David Warner. Josh Hazlewood was named the player of the match for his four-wicket haul.

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  1. Titanium Armour

    Firstly, titanium armours can be spaced apart to increase the effectiveness at stopping bullets. And spacing the titanium sheets apart creates a cushion that slows the bullet before the titanium is penetrated. For example, a titanium shield can have a thin 1.2mm sheet of titanium over the front of the main shield plate. This 1.2mm sheet can have spacer lugs welded to it. Furthermore, a bullets force will be reduced on impact with a space of 1 centimetre inbetween two titanium sheets. And a 1.2mm sheet of titanium in front of the main shield plate would do this. Lastly, this titanium spaced armour has actually been demonstrated and tested to be effective on the American demolition ranches.

    Next, spacing other metals apart would create a similar bullet stopping effect. And I imagine that spacing steel apart would be effective to create a cushion that would slow a bullet. In addition, aluminium would also increase in effectiveness spaced apart. Furthermore, I think because of the properties of aluminium spacing it would have limited benifits. However, you would still increase your bullet stopping power by spacing your aluminium apart. As a result, I think that all your metal and alloy armours should be spaced in some way and taking the time to do that is a good idea. Lastly, when you space your armours apart it is so effective that you can expect to stop a higher calibre bullet. And this is particularly useful on a shield.

    Table#1 Types of Shields
    ——————
    Titanium backpack buckler
    -40cm in diameter
    -4mm thick titanium
    -Weight 2.5kg including handle
    -If the 4mm of titanium is a high tensile strength and spaced correctly you will be able to stop 7.62 NATO and 50cal magnum rounds with this buckler.

    Steel backpack buckler
    -40cm in diameter
    -3.5mm thick steel
    -Weight 3.7kg including handle
    -If the 3.5mm of steel is a high tensile strength and spaced correctly you will be able to stop 5.56 NATO and 45cal magnum rounds with this buckler.

    Titanium Tower Shield
    -100cm×70cm in Area
    -3mm thick titanium
    -Weight 10kg including handle
    -If the 3mm of titanium is a high tensile strength and spaced correctly you will be able to stop 45cal magnum rounds and 5.56 NATO with this shield.

    Titanium Shield
    -50cm×70cm in Area
    -3mm thick titanium
    -Weight 5kg including handle
    -If the 3mm of titanium is a high tensile strength and spaced correctly you will be able to stop 45cal magnum rounds and 5.56 NATO with this shield.

    Aluminium Shield
    -50cm×70cm in Area
    -10mm thick Aluminium
    -Weight 10kg including handle
    -The tensile strength of aluminium varies a lot between regular aluminium and the 7000 series of aluminium. And that means you can make this shield just as effective as titanium.

    Steel Shield
    -50cm×70cm in Area
    -3.5mm thick steel
    -Weight 10kg including handle
    -If the 3.5mm of steel is a high tensile strength and spaced correctly you will be able to stop 45cal magnum rounds and 5.56 NATO with this shield.

    Lastly, the perfect thickness for bullet proof brigandine plates is 3.0mm or 4mm titanium. And you just try and find the highest tensile strength titanium you can and just use that thickness. In addition, I have also decided that if you get a 1mm thick aluminium face size plate you can shape it in to a horror face and then bolt it to your titanium helmet. As a result, you can have a full set of bullet proof brigandine armour with a horror face helmet. That is going to be terrifying with swords and bowling ball cannons. Finally, if your metal tensile strength is high enough you will be able to deflect or even completely proof yourself against 7.62 NATO bullets.

    Table #2 Use of Formulas
    ————
    s = tensile strength in pascals (Pa)
    F = force in newtons (N)
    A = cross-sectional area in (m²)
    m = bullet grain mass (kg)
    a = acceleration of bullet (m/s²)
    t = time of impact (seconds)
    v = velocity (m/s)

    (m(v/t=a)=F)/s=A

    9mm bullet Force = (m(v/t=a)=F)
    v/t=a
    (430m/s)/(0.0024s)=179,167m/s²
    ma=F
    (0.0075kg)(179,167)=1344N

    Aluminium tensile strength = 240MPa = 240000000Pa

    F/s=A
    (1344N)/(240000000)=5.6e-6m²

    5.6e-6m² = 0.0000056m2 = 0.056cm² = 5.6mm²

    Therefore, a 115 grain 9mm bullet traveling at 430m/s requires 5.6mm² of 240MPa Aluminium to block it.

    In addition, a 7.62 NATO applies around 381kg of force on to an armoured plate. Not enough to break bones under a reasonable size plate. However, if the 7.62 NATO hits the corner of a plate you might get a black bruse and welt mark.

    Table #3 use of formulas
    —————————–

    F = force in newtons (N)
    m = bullet grain mass (kg)
    a = acceleration of bullet (m/s²)
    t = time of impact (seconds)
    v = velocity (m/s)

    9mm bullet Force = (m(v/t=a)=F)
    v/t=a
    (430m/s)/(0.0024s)=179,167m/s²
    ma=F
    (0.0075kg)(179,167)=1344N

    1 Newton = 0.10197kg
    (1344N)(0.10197) = 137kg

    Therefore, the 9mm Underwood applies 137kg of weight to the metal plate.

    0.01134kg = 7.62 grain
    790m/s = 7.62 velocity

    7.62mm NATO bullet Force = (m(v/t=a)=F)
    v/t=a
    (790m/s)/(0.0024s) = 329,167m/s²
    ma=F
    (0.01134kg)(329,167) = 3,732N

    1 Newton = 0.10197kg
    (3,732N)(0.10197) = 381kg

    Therefore, the NATO 7.62 hits the plate with a weight of 381kg.

    Reference:
    https://youtu.be/QOkZzjQEx4M
    https://youtu.be/FTYGvL_e1ko
    https://youtu.be/urz8vhJpcIY
    https://youtu.be/pBKItHNe4qk
    https://youtu.be/6on8zQOuS-Q
    https://youtu.be/xLSBRGePh0U
    https://youtu.be/DwXzla2Ye24
    https://youtu.be/T9xMx6_i9mg
    https://youtube.com/shorts/kf9LtS2QDQA?feature=share

  2. From 1948 who were cheated or lied to by their own? Taken for a bad ride. Hope you are now learning from being the aids & abetters, willingly silent for all the atrocities committed. Will there be an end!!!. The Creator, Mother Nature & Mother Earth tolerated enough; now taking action.

    Boomerang.

  3. Second delivery was illegal delivery because he knows that it was tough for left hand batsman to play off wide it results in stress and stretching hamstring and frozen shoulder don't worry that was not their fault but I urge icc to give tip to fast bowler tried to deliver as less wide as possible because it's westage of time and energy

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